Sunday, August 23, 2009

So much for planning, round two :(

See round one here, then see the comments.

8 Comments:

Blogger Shira Salamone said...

See next comment.

Wed Sep 23, 08:34:00 PM 2009  
Blogger Shira Salamone said...

Please keep going.

Wed Sep 23, 08:34:00 PM 2009  
Blogger Shira Salamone said...

Just a little further.

Wed Sep 23, 08:35:00 PM 2009  
Blogger Shira Salamone said...

Thank you for your patience. See below.

Wed Sep 23, 08:35:00 PM 2009  
Blogger Shira Salamone said...

This is another of my (in)famous hidden posts, published in the comments section so as to be invisible to my co-workers, who would have to click to see it.


So much for planning (round 2)

I'll make this explanation as short as possible.

Many colleges in New York State have a policy of admitting so-called "Ability-to-Benefit" students, meaning students who never finished high school or who had poor grades, but who now wish for a second chance and and are believed capable of benefiting from a college education. Unfortunately, the New York State Education Department recently concluded--based, I believe, on the high number of college students who do not complete their college degrees--that the admission standards for ATB students have been too low, and required all colleges in New York State to raise the qualifying scores on required admissions tests.

Result: There has been a radical drop in the number of students enrolled in the college in which my husband is an accounting instructor. Not only are all of his classes smaller, but one class has been reduced to a tutorial, meaning that the students learn mostly by reading, and meet with the instructor only every other week. So my husband is not actually teaching for the number of hours required of a full-time faculty member, and "owes" the college. If this situation persists, it is entirely possible that my husband, whose appointment as a full-time instructor is renewed--or not--annually, may have his faculty status reduced to adjunct (part-time) status effective September 1, 2010. That being the case, and assuming that he doesn't teach over the summer, he will not receive any faculty pay all summer. To say that this will wreak havoc on our budget and retirement plans is an understatement.

posted by Shira Salamone at 9:02 AM

Actually published on September 23, 2009.

Wed Sep 23, 08:37:00 PM 2009  
Blogger Larry Lennhoff said...

Oy. Here's hoping for a rise in the number of students or a rise in the funding to support keeping him full time.

Thu Sep 24, 11:29:00 AM 2009  
Blogger Shira Salamone said...

Fun dein moil in Gott's oir arein--from your mouth to G-d's ear.

Thu Sep 24, 06:00:00 PM 2009  
Blogger Shira Salamone said...

Update: I should also mention that, since there's been a major drop in enrollment, my husband is no longer teaching any "overloads" (extra classes beyond those required of a full-time faculty member) or receiving the extra "overload" pay that goes with them. Bottom line: His net pay has dropped by over $450 per month since July. While we're certainly glad that he's still employed full-time--for the time being--we can't pretend that an income reduction of that size doesn't hurt.

Wed Oct 28, 09:12:00 AM 2009  

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